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Canada Post agrees to 30 day extension to continue negotiations

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Note: The Canadian Union of Postal Workers has not yet released information or response in regards to Canada Post extending the conciliation period with the automatic arbitration at the end of 30 days.

After the Canadian Union of Postal Workers declined an offer of binding arbitration, Canada Post has agreed to a 30 day extension for negotiations. It would be conditional on both parties agreeing to binding arbitration if they’re unable to come to a conclusion within that time.

President of CUPW Local 744 Ellen Bowles explains that her group doesn’t feel that pay equity, one of the issues they are pushing for, should be dealt with in binding arbitration.

“Binding arbitration would make it easier for Canada Post to do what they’ve done with every issue in the past in terms of pay equity. They would fight it all the way to the Supreme Court and it would take 20 years before our members would see pay equity.”

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The 30-day extension will allow for Canada Post and the union to come together at the bargaining table. Bowles explains that the “cooling off period” is a good scenario because they want residents to trust and rely on the mail system.

“Canada Post is already changing the working conditions for the workers. They are sending temps home, they are cancelling people’s vacations and making the conditions on the floor harder. Potentially, provoking the membership and that is something we don’t want, it is just stress.”

She explains that they are in no position to strike and that postal workers want to work.

Other than equity, some of the things the union is pushing for is service expansion and keeping service local.

The union is pushing for residents to make their voice heard about key issues like getting your home mail delivery back, keeping a public post office and creating services like supports for seniors or people with disabilities.

Opinions can be made the Government of Canada website.

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